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Attend to Your Relationship After Baby Arrives
A baby obviously needs an enormous amount of attention, but it can only be served best if the surrounding environment is taken care of.


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The importance of prioritizing your marriage compounds the benefits your child will receive.


For me, it became a powerful internal conflict that grew with each child I had and worse was at the root of the ongoing and escalating conflict with my partner.”
"Marriage is not 50-50, Divorce is 50-50.† Marriage has to be 100-100. It isnít dividing everything in half, itís giving it everything youíve got." ~ Anonymous

"Our first baby is due on Christmas EveÖ" a work colleague was telling me, with excitement about what he called his entry into adulthood. I still remember my own rocky transition across this adulthood divide. As most any parent will attest, there is nothing quite like the singular occupation which happens the moment a newborn baby is laid in your hands. Itís an all-consuming love which like it or not often lays waste to all the other pastimes, hobbies and ways of knowing oneself that came before. Even as much as I longed for my first child, I know that it did not occur to me, until days after she was born how much of how I knew myself that I was going to have to let go.

Itís mind-boggling really how much attention the fragility and wonder of a new life requiresómore even than we think we have. And still this trimming away of our ego and the constant overriding of our own needs, does not come easily. For me, it became a powerful internal conflict that grew with each child I had and worse was at the root of the ongoing and escalating conflict with my partner. Who got to do their own thing, whether occupationally or personally, it became our ground of competition. And as a baby grows so did the challenges of meeting my own needs.

The effort of trying to hold onto my individual identity often left me feeling lonely in my pursuit of mothering and angry at my husband that he wasnít experiencing it. His lack of understanding about my longing for myself isolated us from each other. Of course, one of the first victims of our ongoing estrangement in our relationship was our sex life.

This loss of a sex life is common to new parents. In fact, of all life transitions having a baby is way up on the list for the disruption. Sometimes it takes years for a womanís sex drive and coupleís sex life to return. Of course there is a lot in play hereóeverything from hormones to how couples communicate after the birth of their baby plays a big role. But usually as our sex life starts to slip away, we donít realize how much it will impact the cohesion in our relationship. We donít understand how much release and intimacy comes through the sexual relationship. Losing contact sexually undermines the health and longevity of the relationship in so many other ways. But it is really hard to see because our relationship is already suffering from the ongoing conflict about whose needs get to be met at any given moment.

“Our primary relationship must come first if it has any hopes of evolving into the container we call family.”

All I can say is that looking back, I wish that I had learned earlier the secret power of focusing on the needs of the relationship over and above my own needs. Or for that matter, my partnerís needs or my childís needs. It took me years to figure it out and almost cost me my marriage, but there is an unexplained magical truth to giving your attention to the needs of the relationship.

Our primary relationship must come first if it has any hopes of evolving into the container we call family. Itís a version of how the whole is always bigger than the sum of the parts, but especially when it comes to forming a family. If everyone focuses on the health of the container which is holding all of you, not only will the baby be firmly held in something more secure than either parentís arms, but the partners anchoring the family will find the space to hold each other. I often tell the young mothers that I meet in restaurants that if their baby could talk to them they would say, "love daddy first." Often they look at me like I am crazy, but truly this learning of feeding the intimacy that binds your love is a magical glue that will anchor your family.

Wendy Strgar, founder and CEO of Good Clean Love, is a loveologist who writes and lectures on Making Love Sustainable, a green philosophy of relationships which teaches the importance of valuing the renewable resources of love, intimacy and family. In her new book, "Love that Works: A Guide to Enduring Intimacy," she tackles the challenging issues of sustaining relationships and healthy intimacy with an authentic and disarming style and simple yet innovative advice. It has been called "the essential guide for relationships." The book is available on ebook. Wendy has been married for 27 years to her husband, a psychiatrist, and lives with their four children ages 13-23 in the beautiful Pacific Northwest. You can follow her on Google+

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